Felix Arroyo's Responses to the Create the Vote Questionnaire

If you would prefer a PDF version, download it here.

Addressing Citywide Issues: Just as any other major city, Boston faces many economic and social issues. Can you provide examples on how you would integrate the arts, culture, and creative community in solving social problems? How would you use our community to drive economic development in the city?

Arts, culture, and tourism contribute to the livelihood of our city.  Boston is home to many cultural institutions that make Boston not only a great place to live, but also a great place to visit.  We must support the arts, performances, theatre, music, dance, museums, local artists, cultural exhibits, and creative opportunities that enhance our neighborhoods and contribute to our quality of life.

Boston is a prosperous city and I believe all of our neighborhoods should share in that prosperity.  Developing cultural districts in our city attracts artists, encourages business development, and establishes destinations of cultural experiences for Boston families and visitors.  By supporting living and working space for artists in Boston to thrive and practice their craft, we also promote economic development.

 Integrating the arts, culture and creative community in how we invest in all of our communities will contribute to making all of our neighborhoods economically sustainable.

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House Proposes Drastic Cut for NEA

The U.S House of Representatives Interior Appropriations Subcommittee recently approved its initial FY 2014 funding legislation that proposes a cut of $71 million to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). This would bring funding of the NEA down to $75 million, a level not seen since 1974.

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Next mayor should bet big on the arts

In a Boston Globe op-ed, Philip W. Lovejoy, chair of the Boston Center for the Arts, urges the Boston Mayoral Candidates to make "supporting the arts, arts professionals, and cultural institutions a major issue this November". He notes that this is an especially pivotal time for the city and the impact of a mayor who is not just a supporter, but a champion of the arts "will reverberate through every aspect of urban life". Read the whole article here.  

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Dan Conley's Responses to Create the Vote Questionnaire

If you would prefer to have a PDF version, download it here

1. Addressing Citywide Issues: Just as any other major city, Boston faces many economic and social issues. Can you provide examples on how you would integrate the arts, culture, and creative community in solving social problems? How would you use our community to drive economic development in the city?

Boston’s arts, cultural and creative community have been adding exponentially to Boston’s economy and strengthening the social fabric of the city and individual neighborhoods for decades.  These contributions have largely been from the ground up or driven by private and non-profit sectors, with the city itself playing an important but more limited role, particularly when compared with other cities.  The return on investments in the arts, however, is nothing short of spectacular.  It’s estimated that for every one public dollar invested in the arts, there is a $7 private sector investment return.

But the arts also make Boston a much more livable and workable city.  Artists have traditionally been in the vanguard transforming and stabilizing marginal neighborhoods, including dramatic reductions in crime and blight.  They provide a multitude of jobs, often function as small businesses and create spin-off economic activities and benefits too numerous to list, but certainly including retail, galleries, festivals, and live performance spaces.  Their individual and collective contributions add to Boston’s allure as a tourist destination, with the communities themselves often becoming major draws.

Finally, the arts have long provided outlets for individuals looking to express their vision, their hopes, their dreams, their frustrations, and their politics.  The arts are a powerful tool for social change on a large scale and on an individual scale as they are an accessible career and lifestyle path for people from any background and walk of life.

For all of these reasons, as mayor, I am committed to linking local artists into Boston’s public and private development, (housing, business, and entrepreneurial opportunities) to benefit the artist, the community, and to spur added economic spinoffs.  I’ll support artist housing and make that space permanent through deed restrictions and other legal mechanisms.  This housing will be located strategically, in areas that would be less suitable for traditional family housing.  I’ll seek to find and create live and work space for artists (or work only space) that is affordable and benefits city residents.  In addition, I will look to the artist community for new ideas and advice on maintaining and increasing Boston’s allure for tourism and hospitality.

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Marty Walsh's responses to the Create the Vote Questionnaire

If you would prefer a PDF copy, download it here.

Addressing Citywide Issues: Just as any other major city, Boston faces many economic and social issues. Can you provide examples on how you would integrate the arts, culture, and creative community in solving social problems? How would you use our community to drive economic development in the city?

As the first candidate in this race to vow to elevate the sector to a cabinet-level office in my administration (as it was under Mayor Flynn), I think my commitment is clear. Arts and culture impacts or can impact most if not all other policy areas in a municipal administration. This includes but is not limited to economic development, education, public safety, public health, human services, parks, transportation, city services and more.

In my administration there will be a strategic reframing and naming of this sector to the Arts, Culture, Tourism and the Creative Industries (ACTCI), which is essential to the expansion of Boston’s creative ecosystem. ACTCI encompass all the key pillars that support and fuel the City’s creative economy and help to grow our arts and culture. The addition of Creative Industries better reflects the artists of all disciplines, individuals, nonprofits, and for profit businesses who are the innovators and the contributors that are helping to make Boston one of the best cities in country. This repositioning and redefining of this sector better enables the City of Boston to be included at the policy table for this sector on statewide, national, and international levels. 

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Will city’s next mayor be tuned to the arts?

MASSCreative Executive Director Matt Wilson's letter to The Globe urges voters to consider the candidate’s arts, culture and creative platforms when they vote for the next mayor of Boston.  To keep the creative community thriving and support events like Outside the Box, Boston needs a mayor who is not just a supporter, but a champion of the arts and cultural community. Read the whole article here.

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Bill Walczak is an Arts Voter

Bill Walczak with Linda Nathan at our Create the Vote kickoff event. His sign reads I'm an Arts Voter because "Arts are essential for our humanity."

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Michael Ross is an Arts Voter

Mike Ross at our Create the Vote kickoff event. His sign reads: I am an Arts Voter because "I'm also an artist and believe in arts power to transform and create jobs".

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John Barros' Arts Platform

From John Barros' issue page on his website:

On Developing Local Arts and the Creative Economy

Leading an arts and culture renaissance, John will ensure that Boston develops an overarching vision, arts and cultural plan.  The plan will lift up Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver and San Francisco as models of cities of like size that have dedicated revenue streams (e.g. portion of hotel or sales taxes) and that made real investment into arts infrastructure and understand the arts as an economic driver. John will:

  • Address the lack of public art and arts access in Boston through the expansion and use of local arts infrastructure and programs in schools, community centers and non-profits.

  • Strengthen the local creative economy by supporting more commercial art integration in revitalizing our main streets, including art as a specific driver for economic development in general. Boston can create arts and culture clusters that are marketed to and supported by Boston’s residents and tourists.

  • Increase the focus on Federal, State and Corporate Investments through more aggressive pursuit of state and federal grants and a stronger relationship with corporate partners in improving the cultural life of the city.
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Felix Arroyo's Arts Platform

Taken from Arroyo's issue page on his website

Promoting Arts, Culture & Tourism

Arts, culture and tourism contribute to the livelihood of our city. Boston is home to many cultural institutions that make Boston not only a great place to live, but a great place to visit. We must support the arts, performances, theatre, music, dance, museums, local artists, cultural exhibits, and creative opportunities that enhance our neighborhoods and contribute to our quality of life.

  • Develop cultural districts in our city to attract artists, encourage business development, and establish destinations of cultural experiences for Boston families and visitors.
  • Support living and working space for artists in Boston to thrive and practice their craft.
  • Foster relationships between cultural institutions and community.
  • Encourage tourism to spur economic development and promote Boston as a destination for cultural experiences.
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